OLYMPUS: Shooting Perseid Meteor Shower with Live Composite

Astrophotography Tips: Shoot with Live Composite


Capture star trails – Live Composite

This year’s Perseid Meteor Shower should be one of the most active since 2009 – peaking after 1 a.m. on August 12 (after the moon goes down). Check out these tips from Olympus Trailblazers Jamie MacDonald, Alex McClure and Peter Baumgarten for capturing this spectacular celestial event.

The Basics:
Grab a tripod, find a dark location and point your camera northeast (towards the constellation Perseus). Set your lens to its widest aperture, and manually focus on infinity. It helps to focus on distant lights.

Using Live Composite Mode:
With Live Composite, the camera will build a blended image from a series of exposures. To prevent over exposure, only portions that increase in brightness (like meteors against a night sky) will be added to the final composite.

Set your Exposure Time to 10-20 seconds in the Composite Setting menu. This may change depending on the amount of light pollution in your area. Start running your Live Comp and stop it when you’re happy with the image on your LCD. Longer shooting times will result in more pronounced star trails with your meteor shots, as you will also be capturing the movement of the stars.

Without Live Composite Mode:
Try shooting long exposures (i.e. 24 seconds+) and use Time Lapse on supported cameras in order to capture as many meteors as possible. Using Time Lapse instead of Live Composite Mode is best for capturing meteor photos without star trails (as in the image at top of this email).Without Live Composite Mode: Try shooting long exposures (i.e. 24 seconds+) and use Time Lapse on supported cameras in order to capture as many meteors as possible. Using Time Lapse instead of Live Composite Mode is best for capturing meteor photos without star trails (as in the image at top of this email).


More Astrophotography Tips
OLYMPUS: SHOOT FOR THE STARS!

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